REPAM meeting and speeches at the Vatican – reprinted in English

June 18, 2016

Press conference for the presentation of REPAM

On March 2 (2015) at 11 am, the press conference to present the REPAM was held at the Press Room of the Holy See. The interventions and dialogue that was then established with the assembly allowed to present the network, its priorities, the way it intends to place itself at the service of the activities that the Church already plays in the Amazon region and with the peoples living there. The Amazon region –  shared by many States – is the subject of serious concerns about respect for human rights, socio-economic development, environmental protection and exploitation of natural resources.

Eighty people attended the Press Conference, among those  representatives of the press and members of REPAM, religious representatives of several congregations, members of the diplomatic corps accredited to the Holy See, representatives of associations.  To them, the memory book of the founding meeting of the Network (held in September 2014 in Brasilia under the auspices of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace) was given as a present.

The opening speech of the President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Cardinal Peter K. A. Turkson.

The Bulletin of the Press Office of the Holy See and all interventions.

The press release with the programme of the Meeting.

Coordinating work of REPAM

the Meeting for the internal coordination of REPAM took place.

Specifically, the issues on the table were: the link between REPAM and Church at the local level (especially with dioceses); the presence of international networks, such as Caritas Internationalis and CIDSE, in the life of REPAM and in raising awareness in the public in many countries about the problems of the Amazon region; possible actions of political and institutional impact that REPAM could play, particularly with regard to the promotion and protection of human rights; communication strategies of REPAM inward and outward; the need to enhance spirituality and traditional knowledge of the peoples of the region. Among the concerns repeatedly emerged: the behavior of mining and hydrocarbons industries, the way they treat or consider many indigenous peoples, poverty in urban areas and the challenge to propose an alternative model of economic development, sustainable and equitable for the Amazon region.

Some participants called for a meeting of all the Bishops of the Amazon (about 90, two thirds of whom are Brazilians).

The meeting was attended by about forty people, including observers of the Church come from Asia, Europe and Africa.

The opening speech of the President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Cardinal Peter Turkson.

The website Ecclesial Panamazzonica:  www.redamazonica.org

Intervention of Card. Peter Turkson

For several years, some Latin American churches have organized to meet the regional challenges of the Amazonian environment. The Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, which is following with interest these initiatives, wanted to accompany and sponsor the Ecclesial Network Panamazzonica (REPAM) since its creation in September in Brasilia. At the meeting of coordination that will begin this afternoon, we present with great pleasure REPAM here.

I want to focus on two aspects, namely the elements that distinguish the REPAM and the reason for which you have tried to present this project in Rome.

The main features of REPAM are:

a. Transnationality : the high number of countries involved is due to the awareness that effective counteraction to challenges that transcend the boundaries of a single state requires the synergy of the living forces of all interested nations: from the level of the Secretariat REPAM to that of dioceses and other Church initiatives in the various States, without forgetting that, at inception, REPAM works in tune with the Holy See, the CELAM and its facilities.

b. The ecclesial nature : Besides operating transnationally, the REPAM aims to create a harmonious cooperation between the various components of the Church: religious congregations, dioceses, Caritas, Catholic associations or foundations, and lay groups.

c. The commitment to the protection of life : the REPAM was created to address major challenges. At stake is the defense of life of various communities which, when added together, represent more than 30 million people. They are threatened by pollution, radical and rapid change of the ecosystem on which they depend, and the lack of basic human rights. This occurs when, for example, deforestation progresses unchecked, or when intensive mining and agricultural projects are started without consulting, let alone involve the local populations of the Amazon, with respect for their dignity.

We come now to the second point: Why Rome? This choice is due not only to the high symbolic importance for the Church of Peter, but also to the desire to give visibility to REPAM. The way the REPAM by acting as a “platform”, will be structured and will define its mode of operation, its priorities for action, its allies or its accreditation procedures, could serve as a model to other local churches of other continents that are facing similar challenges. In addition, the REPAM is designed so as to become a usable tool in different and crucial areas, such as justice, the rule of law, the promotion and protection of human rights;cooperation between the Church and public institutions at various levels; prevention and management of conflicts; study and dissemination of information; inclusive and equitable economic development; the responsible and supportive use of natural resources, respect of Creation; the preservation of traditional cultures and ways of life of various peoples.

Finally, I wish to emphasize that the accompaniment to REPAM by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, it is in line with recent works that they have made. Among them, I should mention those relating to: the use of energy resources ( Energy, Justice and Peace , LEV 2013), the management of land, the production and consumption of food ( Land and Food , LEV 2015), the economy inclusive and responsible investment (seminars in 2014), the responsibility of entrepreneurs (with the publication the vocation of business leaders. a reflection, the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, 2013). These issues also affect the Amazon that although for a long time has been considered a difficult to reach area, is now at the center of many interests. Therefore, we need to find ways that respect the human dignity to manage natural resources Amazonian, promote the economic development of the region and promote governance inclusive, democratic, having as objective the true common good of the human family.

Thanks for your attention.

[00338-01.01] [Original text: Italian]

Intervention of the Card. Cláudio Hummes

Ladies and gentlemen,

I greet you all and thank you for your presence and attention. I hope that the meeting of REPAM (Network Ecclesial Pan-Amazon) with the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, which will take place in these two days, 2 and 3 March, here in Rome, bring a great contribution to the objectives that you REPAM It proposes. In the nine Latin American countries that include the Amazon territory, the Network wants to unite the efforts of the Church to encourage responsible and sustainable housing across the region, in order to promote the integral good, human rights, evangelization, development cultural, social and economic development of its people, especially the indigenous peoples.

Pope Francis has strongly encouraged us in this direction, when in the course of World Youth Day, in 2013, in Rio de Janeiro, speaking to the Brazilian Bishops, he said that “the Amazon is a decisive test, a test for the Church and society “and added,” a strong reminder to respect and care of the whole creation that God has entrusted to man not because it exploits wildly, but because it makes it a garden. ” And he said: “I would like to add that should be further encouraged and relaunched the work of the Church in the Amazon.” The creation of the Pan-Amazonian Network Ecclesial stands as further incentive and relaunch the work of the Church in the Amazon, strongly desired by the Holy Father. There, the Church wants to be with courage and determination of a missionary Church, merciful, prophetic, close to all people, especially the poorest, the excluded, the rejected, the forgotten and the wounded. A Church with a “face the Amazon” and “native clergy”, as proposed by Pope Francis in his aforementioned speech to the Brazilian bishops.

The Amazon is made up of “a biome in which we see the life in his mega diversity as a gift of God to all. Unfortunately, it is also an increasingly devastated territory and threatened” (Declaration of the creation of REPAM). The de-forestation and growing in place for a long time, the big agricultural projects, hydroelectric plants, extraction of oil and other mineral wealth, monocultures and climate change subject to severe natural environment and risk dignity and self-determination of the population, especially the indigenous people, the poor who live on the banks of the rivers, the campesinos, of African descent, and even the poor inhabitants of the local towns.

Therefore, the Church in the Amazon wants to “networking”, to join the efforts to encourage one another and to have a more significant prophetic voice at the international level, when it is in question the Amazon and its people.

Finally, I ask you, professionals of the global and local communication, not to forget the Amazon. It is decisive for the future of humanity. Thank you!

Speech by Mr Michel Roy

As the Confederation of 165 organizations working around the world to contribute to justice – through the social service, development cooperation and humanitarian aid emergency – Caritas Internationalis has participated in the creation of the Pan-Amazon Network ecclesial process (REPAM ), since 2014, reflecting the presence and commitment of Caritas for the poor in the vast Amazon region. The mission of Caritas is to promote human development and social justice in a world in which the fruits of the earth are shared equitably in the human family.

The climate is changing more and more rapidly, and this has a serious impact on populations most exposed to prolonged droughts, floods, earthquakes and tsunamis, conflicts related to access to water and migration. The development based on unlimited growth, which requires more raw materials, directly affects the populations in rich countries in petroleum, gas and minerals, in rivers that are transformed into hydroelectric projects or for irrigation on a large scale, in the areas of land used for produce ethanol, palm oil or soya extensively, in forests that strike … Among these people are the indigenous people all over the planet most affected, often considered cumbersome, impediments to the realization of ambitious development projects, and in general the poorest and most defenseless, whose rights are being systematically crushed. It so happens in the Amazon, a lung of the Earth in which they live hundreds of people. Caritas Ecuador first, reached by other Caritas of the Amazon region which includes 8 countries, has embarked on an ecclesial dynamics for the protection of Creation: men and nature.

As a global cooperation actor, Caritas Internationalis at the service of REPAM its mission to cooperate for the common good, through the creation and support of networks for the exchange of knowledge and experience , of fraternal collaboration, leading to specific attention a thematic or geographical area determined , as is the case with the REPAM.This is right in line with its first foundational requirement, which is to respond in a coordinated manner to the challenges of the Pan-Amazon, in a vision of the international network.

The Amazon is, along with the forest of the Congo, perhaps what is most valuable for the planet. The other great forests, like that of Borneo, have almost completely disappeared, without being able to then combat climate change. Our responsibility is to “turn off the engines” and stop. Stop us from wanting to produce at any cost, by plunder and destroy, stop by stripping the peoples of the environment that allows them to live with their culture and their human wealth. They are a gift to humanity. We must help them to preserve it. Why Caritas Internationalis, at the request of its members in the Amazonian America, is committed alongside them because the Amazon is protected in all its components, and because its development occurs on the basis of the wealth of its inhabitants.

This is why Caritas Internationalis is also engaged in the fight against climate change, in its role of defender on the international stage , where it promotes a substantial anthropological vision from the Teaching office of the Church and centered on the defense of human dignity. In bringing the Church’s message in politics, Caritas Internationalis sphere promotes “non-negotiable” values the dignity of every person, justice, solidarity, cooperation and the protection of nature. As such Caritas Internationalis prepares the Paris summit and will follow the commitments that States will take to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, recalling the urgency of protecting the Pan-Amazon.

This is why Caritas Internationalis explores continuously the opportunity to collaborate with other civil society organizations and religious, in order to bring these concerns to the heart of the authorities responsible for these decisions for the future of the planet and humanity.

Finally, why Caritas Internationalis promotes the need for a change of life style, for everyone, for simplicity, for the respect of Creation, to protect the future of our children.

The Amazon shows that the choice of another world is possible. We are all called to really invest in this choice.

The reflection on Ecology by Fr. Michael Czerny SJ [ENG][ESP], who, at the end of the meeting, was appointed commissioner of the Executive Committee of REPAM.

The Pan-Amazonic Church Network – REPAM “Catholic Ecology, socially and pastorally speaking, 2015” Michael Czerny S.J.1 Beginning in 1974, I have been blessed to visit seven of the nine Amazonic countries (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, French Guyana, Perú, Surinam and Venezuela) … but only recently did I discover that I was actually visiting the Pan-Amazonia! Thanks to this discovery, while looking at somewhat familiar, at the same time we are adopting an important new perspective – a social and pastoral viewpoint, as the title of this talk suggests. Further, we are challenged to keep our viewpoint comprehensive, one which embraces all and would understand all, and be completely engaged, without sacrificing any important aspect. And so to state my point most briefly, a truly Catholic ecology is an all-comprehensive and very committed ecology. There are four components to consider: I) what is ecology? II) who will read the encyclical? III) what kind of ecology? and IV) in conclusion: Go REPAM go! I) What is ecology? Here are four inter-related key words: Environment comes from the French virer, “to turn” or “to veer,” and environ “around,” from which we get “to turn round” and finally “surroundings.” Environment not only refers to all the surrounding conditions that influence botanical, biological and human life but also suggests that we pay ever more careful attention to how pollution might damage them. Ecology starts with three letters “eco” from the Greek oikos, which means “home or household”; and then adds logos, which is “discourse, meaning, sense.” So ecology is meaningful talk about our home the earth. The modern term “ecology” was introduced by the biologist Ernest Häckel in 1869. It is the scientific study of living beings in relationship with their surroundings. Being “a wondrous work of the Creator,” the natural environment contains “a ‘grammar’ which sets forth ends and criteria for its wise use, not its reckless exploitation” (Civ 48). Pope Francis, like Pope Emeritus Benedict, relates ecology to two other words beginning with more or less the same letters. Economy starts with oikos and adds nomos, “rule” or “law”; and ecumenical builds on oikos to become oikoumenē gē, “the whole inhabited world” and all its inhabitants including our descendants. The three words beginning with oikos imply how we should dwell and behave here on our planet – we are members of one household common to all. Moreover, each of the four key words suggests a quality or virtue that we need in order to embrace God’s gift of nature: environment calls for awareness, 1 President’s Office, Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace. [email protected] 2 | P a g e ecology enjoins responsibility, economy requires justice, and ecumenical hearkens to unity, not only global but also intergenerational. Thus, in addition to their definitional meanings, these four key words also contain suggestive clues for appreciating Catholic social teaching on the environment. Moreover, in these four words we discover some of the inter-related dimensions of our catholic and pan-Amazonic comprehension. It is not a narrow reductionist ecology, but rather a broad, generous and deep ecology that we need in order to comprehend the whole territory. So our eco-logos is profoundly human, it is abundantly environmental, it is realistically economic, and it is strategically ecumenical! We are called to protect and care for both creation and the human person. These concepts are reciprocal and, together, they make for authentic and sustainable human development. To speak about the environment and ecology is to speak about a great deal! At every Eucharist, the celebrant says, “Blessed are you, Lord God of all Creation, for through your goodness we have received the bread we offer you, fruit of the earth and work of human hands. It will become for us the bread of life.” How does this familiar prayer strike you as members and friends of REPAM? For me it expresses the dynamic relationships in which we exist and act, receive and give, pray and work. In these words we have the whole universe, the fruitful earth and a bit of bread, God’s generosity and human work and our offering … in these words, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI would have us accept the renewed and “pressing invitation to respect the natural environment, a precious resource entrusted to our stewardship.”2 Our eco-logos is deeply spiritual, theological, liturgical and practical (oriented towards action). II) Who will read the long-awaited encyclical on ecology? And how should it be read? Here is my conviction: each and every one of us needs to read the encyclical in three complementary ways: as a believer, as an inhabitant of the earth, and as the citizen of a country. 1) First then, the readers are believers. All human beings are believers. The vast majority are religious believers.3 A minority denies that they “are religious” or “have faith” or are affiliated. But all people, even these, need to take responsibility for their beliefs. So, when it comes to ecology and the Encyclical, the first way in which we read it is as believers. Climate change, human trafficking, the challenges and problems of the Pan-Amazonia are issues which engage each one’s faith or beliefs. Written by the Catholic Holy Father and first addressed to the leaders and the members of the Church, the Encyclical will surely help us Catholics and fellow Christians to rediscover the very necessary theological and spiritual roots of our ecological concerns. Second, it will help fellowbelievers in other faiths to rediscover their own religious and spiritual roots and perhaps learn from ours. Third, even those who are indifferent or hostile might appreciate such roots and hopefully understand their importance. Some may think that faith is an optional add-on to ecological commitment. That is like saying that the foundation is an optional add-on for a building. For it is by faith we know that we are creatures, not the accidental or fortuitous products of blind forces or chance coincidences. “Mother Earth” and “Family of Man” are lovely expressions but they can remain decorative, merely rhetorical. During Lent we are especially aware of the serious obstacles to behaving as we should. What are the 2 Benedict XVI, Angelus, 15 November 2009. 3 A comprehensive demographic study of more than 230 countries and territories conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life finds that more than eight-in-ten people worldwide identify with a religious group. The report estimates that there are 5.8 billion religiously affiliated adults and children around the globe, representing 84% of the 2010 world population of 6.9 billion. (December 2012) 3 | P a g e obstacles to genuine ecology and integral human development? Greed, short-sightedness, consumerism, selfishness, chauvinism, racism, etc., etc. Sad, but true. It is by faith that we come to believe that we are sons and daughters of a loving Father, that we learn (slowly!) to behave like brothers and sisters to each other, that we learn (slowly!) to express gratitude for all that God has made and to exercise stewardship for it all. It is by faith that we feel connected as brothers and sisters to each other and to those still waiting to be born. 2) I turn now to “inhabitants of the earth.” The readers of the Encyclical are also inhabitants of the planet. As fellow dwellers-upon-the-earth, they should read the encyclical – for we all have to face the issues it will raise. No inhabitant of the planet, now or in future, can say “I’m not involved, ecology doesn’t concern me, and I’m not interested.” Every inhabitant needs to get informed – in proportion, of course, to his or her capacity and situation. Can anyone say, “I’m not a climate scientist, therefore I’m not competent in this area?” In fact, the vast majority of us are not climate scientists, nevertheless each of us does need to learn about the situation in order to fulfil our responsibilities as a believer and as an earth’s inhabitant. For its part, science has done its best, collecting as much data as possible, collaborating amongst many specializations, pooling their competences, arriving at their consensus and giving their advice. For example, is climate change man-made (anthropogenic)? Or is it a cyclical process of nature? Or is it probably due to both? And, whatever the causes, is there something to be done? What is not contested is that our planet is getting warmer. Indeed, the November 2014 Synthesis Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, is very stark. In the words of Thomas Stocker, the co-chair of IPCC Working Group 1: “Our assessment finds that the atmosphere and oceans have warmed, the amount of snow and ice has diminished, the sea level has risen and the concentration of carbon dioxide has increased to a level unprecedented in at least the last 800,000 years.”4 This is the consensus of over 800 scientists of the IPCC, and represents an enormous challenge. Now it is up to us, non-scientists and believers and earth-inhabitants that we are, to reach a conclusion and follow through. Just like most of us, Pope Francis faces the challenge, in preparing his encyclical, of properly appreciating the scientific consensus about climate change, its causes and consequences, and the needed remedies. The world’s leading religious leader will, I believe, draw upon his faith, upon the teaching of the Church, and upon the best information and advice available, demonstrating how each of us can manage gather and sift the information, to judge, to decide and, finally, to act. And the word “act” brings us to … 3) … our third “reading”: we read the encyclical as citizens. Besides being a believer and an inhabitant, each of us is also the resident of a village, town, city and the citizen of a sovereign state. There are ecological tasks, and decisions to take, at each level. When it comes to the more global issues like the oceans or the climate, such decisions are still largely made by each country. It is mainly the government of each country which decides about ecology and climate change. It is as citizens of our country that we can influence the decisions that need to be taken, and to exercise our political responsibility for those decisions. 4 http://www.un.org/climatechange/blog/2014/11/climate-change-threatens-irreversible-dangerous-impacts-optionsexist-limit-effects/ 4 | P a g e The timing of the new encyclical is significant: 2015 is a critical year for humanity. In July, nations will gather for the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa. In September, the U.N. General Assembly should agree on a new set of sustainable development goals running until 2030. In December, the Climate Change Conference in Paris will receive the plans and commitments of each Government to slow or reduce global warming. The months of 2015 are crucial, then, for decisions about care for or stewardship of the earth, about effective commitment to international development and human flourishing. The last important meeting towards a climate change agreement took place in Lima. This is how Pope Francis evaluated it: “The meeting in Perú was nothing great” (15.1.15). There was no lack of scientific evidence or concrete steps proposed. But there was a desperate lack of so-called “political will”. “I was disappointed by the lack of courage; things came to a stop at a certain point.” For the decision-making needs to go well beyond the term of office of current governments and well beyond their national boundaries, and it also needs to include the needs and interests of future generations. Binding regulations, effective policies, and measurable targets are the necessary means and tools. Never before in history have the Holy Father and the Catholic Church weighed in so explicitly on a vast global process underway. “The important thing is that there be a bit of time between the issuing of the encyclical and the meeting in Paris, so that it can make a contribution…. Let’s hope that in Paris the delegates will be more courageous and will move forward with this.”5 So, reading the Encyclical and facing the issues it will raise, it is citizens of a country who need to generate support – or even pressure – for the decisions our elected or appointed decision-makers need to take. III) What kind of ecology? If we agree that environmental language and action should avoid extremes, this raises the question: What are the proper boundaries? Vatican II affirmed that “God intended the earth with everything contained in it for the use of all human beings and peoples.” 6 In the early 90s, Saint Pope John Paul II gave eloquent expression to environmental concern: “People are rightly worried — though much less than they should be — about preserving the natural habitats of the various animal species threatened with extinction, because they realize that each of these species makes its particular contribution to the balance of nature in general.” He then masterfully broadened and deepened the scope: “In addition to the irrational destruction of the natural environment, we must also mention the more serious destruction of the human environment… Too little effort is made to safeguard the moral conditions for an authentic ‘human ecology’.”7 Pope Benedict went on to develop “the links between natural ecology, or respect for nature, and human ecology. Experience shows that disregard for the environment always harms human coexistence, and vice versa.”8 And the vital importance of human ecology rests in this: to “protect mankind from selfdestruction… If there is a lack of respect for the right to life and to a natural death, if human 5 Gerry O’Connell, interview on the plane, 2015.01.15 6 Gaudium et Spes, § 69. 7 John Paul II, Centesimus Annus, § 38. 8 Benedict XVI, Message, World Day of Peace 2007, § 8. 5 | P a g e conception, gestation and birth are made artificial, if human embryos are sacrificed to research, the conscience of society ends up losing the concept of human ecology and, along with it, that of environmental ecology” (Civ 51). Indeed how could one claim to bring about peace, the integral development of peoples or even the protection of the environment without defending the life of those who are weakest, beginning with the unborn. Every offence against life, especially at its beginning, inevitably causes irreparable damage to development, peace and the environment.9 Divine revelation is our guide to human nature: “Nature expresses a design of love and truth. It is prior to us, and it has been given to us by God as the setting for our life. Nature speaks to us of the Creator (cf. Rom 1:20) and his love for humanity. It is destined to be ‘recapitulated’ in Christ at the end of time (cf. Eph 1:9-10; Col 1:19-20). Thus it too is a ‘vocation.’10 Nature is at our disposal … as a gift of the Creator who has given it an inbuilt order, enabling man to draw from it the principles needed in order ‘to till it and keep it’ (Gen 2:15)” (Civ 48). Here is the crucial correlation: “The way humanity treats the environment influences the way it treats itself, and vice versa… [T]he decisive issue is the overall moral tenor of society” (Civ 51) eventually but inevitably affects the health of the planet. Pope Benedict’s messages on environment and ecology guide a sound understanding which consistently keeps the human within nature (not opposed or neglected) and gratefully acknowledges nature as work and gift of the Creator. What perspective could be more important than this! The Catholic Church “is likewise conscious of the responsibility which all of us have for our world, for the whole of creation, which we must love and protect.”11 In his first Easter message urbi et orbi, the Pope wished peace to the whole world, torn apart by … the iniquitous exploitation of natural resources! Peace to this our Earth! May the risen Jesus … make us responsible guardians of creation.”12 Now, nearly two years later, everyone should already be able to guess at the content of the Encyclical. In addition to Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis has spoken or written about this topic at least 25 times since his election. The encyclical will (i) help us to deepen our faith and spirituality, our bonds of fraternity and solidarity with all our fellow inhabitants and all future generations; (ii) help to turn our partial and fragmented knowledge into the best possible wisdom; and (iii) motivate us to act committedly in our cities, towns and villages and in our organizational, family and personal lives, with greatest political responsibility, internationally and nationally, policy-wise and economically. IV And the conclusion: Go REPAM go! My three readings have been filled with questions. Please allow me one more, by way of conclusion. The question is: what kind of kairós do the challenges of ecology and climate change put us into? “A moment of doom” we could say: man’s greed, stupidity, carelessness and pride have caused so much irreversible damage that we find ourselves at the very edge of self-destruction. Humanity destroys the planet, its only home. If we get out of this crisis alive, it will be a kind of second-best salvage operation. 9 Benedict XVI, Message, World Day of Peace 2013, § 4. 10 John Paul II, Message, World Day of Peace 1990, § 6. 11 Francisco, Discurso a los representantes de las Iglesias y comunidades eclesiales y de otras religiones, 20/03/2013. 12 Francisco, Easter Sunday, Urbi et Orbi, 31/03/2013. 6 | P a g e Maybe there is another way of looking at the current moment. Until recently, nature with its powerful forces and mysterious processes, seemed to be entirely “in charge”, with the human family at its mercy, struggling to survive and eke out a living. While this is still true for the majority, the vulnerable majority, nevertheless as a whole the human family is being impelled — by the climate crisis – to grow up and take on a new kind and level of responsibility. For the first time, in a mature way, we must exercise common responsibility for the earth, our common home. Is this our kairós now? Taking the earth as a whole, the Pan-Amazonia is a big piece of it. Surely the Pan-Amazonia will require every dimension of ecology that we have seen, both human and environmental; the PanAmazonia will require deep faith, with the qualities of awareness, responsibility, justice, unity, not only global but also intergenerational; and the Pan-Amazonia will require powerful and prolonged commitment, and constant networking. Before REPAM, maybe we found ourselves hampered by fragmentation and limitations, rather caught up each one in our own needs and projects, each one very busy in our own boxes and silos but generally failing to meet the measure of the challenges posed by the Pan-Amazonia in all her dimensions. Now, just as the Encyclical will call each believer, inhabitant and citizen to conversion, responsibility and action, so too REPAM is offering its participant organizations the possibility of going beyond both national and organizational limitations, and to be living the continuous conversion of the Gospel. Instead, REPAM will keep on trying to take hold of a complex and changing reality. This will take transparent communication, pooling of information, sharing of resources, ongoing collaboration. By bringing together all people as believers, inhabitants, citizens in a great territory to face the issues which surpass the capacity of any one country, REPAM is modelling a new way of taking up our common responsibilities as believers, earth-inhabitants and citizens … citizens, now, not just of individual countries but of larger international regions and maybe one day world citizens. “Your presence is decisive for the future of the area,” Pope Francis said to the Brazilian Bishops in July 2013. These 10 words summarize well both his challenge to REPAM and his encouragement for the network. His and our prayer for REPAM, in his message to your first meeting in Brasilia: “May the Christian effervescence enrich the living cultures of the Amazonia and their values and make them progress.”13 13 Pope Francis, Message sent by Secretary of State Cardinal Parolin, 8.9.2014: “Que el fermento cristiano fecunde y haga progresar a las culturas vivas de la Amazonía y sus valores.”

[00337-01.01] [Original text: Italian]

Intervention by HE Msgr. Pedro Ricardo Barreto Jimeno, SI

Realidad GEOGRAPHICAL

El territory Amazónico es el bosque tropical más extenso del mundo. It includes seis millones de Km2 (20 veces más que el de Italian territory).

The Amazonía es por compartida Guyana, Suriname y Guyana Francesa (00:15%), Venezuela (1%), Ecuador (2%), Colombia (6%), Bolivia (11%), Peru (13%) y Brasil (67% ).

Realidad HUMANA Y CULTURAL

The extensa Amazonía hogar es de que 2’779,478 indígenas corresponden to 390 pueblos indígenas y pueblos aislados 137 (no contactados) con el valor de sus culturas ancestrales, 240 sus lenguas habladas pertenecientes 49 familias lingüísticas.

SOCIAL ISSUES – AMBIENTAL

The Amazonía es a territory devastado amenazado y por las concesiones de los Estados in las Corporaciones transnacionales.Los grandes proyectos extractivos, los monocultivos y el cambio climático ponen en riesgo serious sus tierras y el entorno natural. Destruyen of culture, autodeterminación de los pueblos y sobre todo afectan to Christ encarnado en las personas que lo habitan (pueblos originarios, ribereños, campesinos, Afro DESCENDIENTES y poblaciones urbanas).

CONSECUENCIAS Y amenazas

Hoy estamos viviendo a high incidencia de sequías en la Amazonía. Algo que no se CREIA posible y que hoy estamos experimentando with much fuerza. The Amazonía eg a natural biome, es decir, a living system que funciona como estabilizador climático regional y global producir to 1/3 de las lluvias alimentan la tierra que, sin embargo está amenazado. More than 20% of de cobertura vegetal ya no existe. Sin embargo los Estados priorizan el crecimiento económico y sociales que las políticas favorezcan the explotación de los recursos naturales como Urgencia nacional.

MISIÓN DE LA IGLESIA

“Nuestra vocación custodiar es toda la creación, the belleza de la creación, como se nos en el says book of Génesis y como nos muestra San Francisco de Asís: eg take respeto por todas las criaturas de Dios y por el entorno en el que vivimos “(Pope Francisco, 19-03.2013).

NACIMIENTO COMPROMISO Y DE LA REPAM

The REPAM if it creates como la respuesta de Dios in esta necesidad sentida urgent cuidar y de la vida de las personas para que en vivan armonía with naturaleza y desde la expands variada presencia de los miembros y equipos de la Iglesia en la Pan-Amazonía.

Reafirmamos lo que el papa Francisco said: “The Iglesia no está en la Amazonia como quien holds hechas las maletas IRSE para después de explotarla. Desde el principle this está en ella with misioneros, congregaciones religiosas, sacerdotes, laicos Obispos y, y su presencia es crucial para el futuro de la zona “(Francisco en Río de Janeiro, 27.07. 13)

Por eso la Red Eclesial Pan-Amazónica llamada está a ser una verdadera experiencia de fraternidad, a solidary caravan y a peregrinación sagrada, para responder de manera y eficaz orgánica clamores a los del pueblo y Amazónico of this future.

El proceso de creación de la Red Eclesial Pan Amazónica está animado por el Departamento de Justicia y Solidaridad del Consejo Episcopal Latinoamericano (CELAM), the Comisión para la Amazonía de la Conferencia Episcopal de Brasil (CNBB), las presidencias the Secretariado Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Cáritas (SELACC), de la Confederación Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Religiosas y Religiosos (CLAR) y de los misioneros Misioneras y que han entregado y vida en entregan of the Pan – Amazonía.

Nuestro agradecimiento the Pontifical Consejo Justicia y Paz, the person en del Cardenal Peter Turkson of equipo ya todo por su apoyo invalorable en el proceso de crecimiento de la Red Eclesial Pan-Amazónica.

Gracias a ustedes, y comunicadores comunicadoras, por su presencia y la difusión de esta propuesta pastoral de la REPAM.

[00342-04.01] [Texto original: Español]

Speech by Mr Michel Roy

As the Confederation of 165 organizations working around the world to contribute to justice – through the social service, development cooperation and humanitarian aid emergency – Caritas Internationalis has participated in the creation of the Pan-Amazon Network ecclesial process (REPAM ), since 2014, reflecting the presence and commitment of Caritas for the poor in the vast Amazon region. The mission of Caritas is to promote human development and social justice in a world in which the fruits of the earth are shared equitably in the human family.

The climate is changing more and more rapidly, and this has a serious impact on populations most exposed to prolonged droughts, floods, earthquakes and tsunamis, conflicts related to access to water and migration. The development based on unlimited growth, which requires more raw materials, directly affects the populations in rich countries in petroleum, gas and minerals, in rivers that are transformed into hydroelectric projects or for irrigation on a large scale, in the areas of land used for produce ethanol, palm oil or soya extensively, in forests that strike … Among these people are the indigenous people all over the planet most affected, often considered cumbersome, impediments to the realization of ambitious development projects, and in general the poorest and most defenseless, whose rights are being systematically crushed. It so happens in the Amazon, a lung of the Earth in which they live hundreds of people. Caritas Ecuador first, reached by other Caritas of the Amazon region which includes 8 countries, has embarked on an ecclesial dynamics for the protection of Creation: men and nature.

As a global cooperation actor, Caritas Internationalis at the service of REPAM its mission to cooperate for the common good, through the creation and support of networks for the exchange of knowledge and experience , of fraternal collaboration, leading to specific attention a thematic or geographical area determined , as is the case with the REPAM.This is right in line with its first foundational requirement, which is to respond in a coordinated manner to the challenges of the Pan-Amazon, in a vision of the international network.

The Amazon is, along with the forest of the Congo, perhaps what is most valuable for the planet. The other great forests, like that of Borneo, have almost completely disappeared, without being able to then combat climate change. Our responsibility is to “turn off the engines” and stop. Stop us from wanting to produce at any cost, by plunder and destroy, stop by stripping the peoples of the environment that allows them to live with their culture and their human wealth. They are a gift to humanity. We must help them to preserve it. Why Caritas Internationalis, at the request of its members in the Amazonian America, is committed alongside them because the Amazon is protected in all its components, and because its development occurs on the basis of the wealth of its inhabitants.

This is why Caritas Internationalis is also engaged in the fight against climate change, in its role of defender on the international stage , where it promotes a substantial anthropological vision from the Teaching office of the Church and centered on the defense of human dignity. In bringing the Church’s message in politics, Caritas Internationalis sphere promotes “non-negotiable” values the dignity of every person, justice, solidarity, cooperation and the protection of nature. As such Caritas Internationalis prepares the Paris summit and will follow the commitments that States will take to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, recalling the urgency of protecting the Pan-Amazon.

This is why Caritas Internationalis explores continuously the opportunity to collaborate with other civil society organizations and religious, in order to bring these concerns to the heart of the authorities responsible for these decisions for the future of the planet and humanity.

Finally, why Caritas Internationalis promotes the need for a change of life style, for everyone, for simplicity, for the respect of Creation, to protect the future of our children.

The Amazon shows that the choice of another world is possible. We are all called to really invest in this choice.

[00343-01.01] [Original text: Italian]

 

Speech by Mr Mauricio López Oropeza

Este proceso denominado Red Eclesial Pan-Amazónica -REPAM- representa años de historia y presencia próxima-prójima with aquellos que han sido olvidados vulnerados y en este territory; de luces y de sombras en la búsqueda de Emprender a misión inmensa, compleja y profunda; y de una entrega de vida coherente to pesar de las enormes dificultades. The REPAM a esfuerzo es que ha sido animado por el Departamento de Justicia y Solidaridad -DEJUSOL- of CELAM, the Comisión para la Amazonía of the CNBB; el Secretariado Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Cáritas -SELACC; y la Confederación Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Religiosos y Religiosas -CLAR-, junto with núcleos eclesiales diversos ya trabajando en perspectiva Pan-Amazónica, y con el apoyo del Consejo seek Pontifical Justicia y Paz.

Como Red Eclesial Amazónica y desde la especificidad de que cada instancia integrates, queremos acompañar a nuestros pueblos en:

– Promover a de trabajo conjunto, the colaboración en clave territorial, y la dinamización de acciones articuladas desde la visión común Pan-Amazónica como Iglesia.

– The integral promoción de las poblaciones Amazonicas, para ellas que sean de sujetos transformación en la Iglesia y en la sociedad.

– El respeto a las culturas, tradiciones, costumbres, creencias, organizaciones y ritmos de la gente de la Amazonia. Hacer una opción preferencial por los más pobres y Excluidos de estos territorios.

– Buscar la Liberación de las poblaciones Amazonicas, signo del Reino de Dios.

– La defensa de los derechos humanos y particularmente de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, ribereños, pobladores urbanos y Afro-DESCENDIENTES.

– El cuidado y respeto por el medio ambiente en la Amazonia y en todo el planeta.

– The incidencia en políticas públicas de carácter local, nacional and internacional a favor de los que Viven en la pan-amazon y de sus diversos Desafíos.

– The reflexión profunda sobre la realidad de este biome (live system), con el fin de buscar junto a nuestras comunidades y pueblos, soluciones dignifiquen que sus vidas.

– Desarrollar procesos de investigación y de las caracterización problemáticas POTENCIALIDADES territoriales y que nos ayuden to fortalecer el trabajo de transformación the imaginary consumerist en espacios externos in the Pan-Amazonía.

– Establecer mecanismos sistemáticos with relevancia y en el Ámbito comunicacional

En Septiembre de 2014, luego de un proceso de diagnóstico, diálogo, y construcción de consensos, hemos establecido los grandes sueños de la REPAM:

Visión de la REPAM

Misión de la REPAM

A la luz del Evangelio de Jesucristo muerto y Resucitado, queremos vivir una experiencia de fraternidad y solidaridad encarnada and inculturada, como instrumento de diálogo y unidad eclesial, señal y horizonte del Reino de Dios (junto with otros-as de buena voluntad), to servicio de la Pan Amazonía, en defensa de la vida, Don de Dios, seriously amenazada, lo que implies “crear conciencia en las Américas de la importancia de la Amazonia para toda la humanidad” (DA 475).

Desde a plataforma de intercambio y enriquecimiento mortgage y una de confluencia esfuerzos de las Iglesias locales, congregaciones religiosas, instituciones eclesiales laicado y, y organizaciones Afines with Profética voz y al servicio de la vida, de la creación de los pobres, y bien común, como nos proponemos RED ECLESIAL pAN-Amazônica -REPAM-, potenciar de manera articulada, the acción que realiza la Iglesia en territory pan Amazónico, actualizando y opciones concretando Apostolicas conjuntas, integrales y multi-escalares, en el marco de la doctrina y las orientaciones de la Iglesia.

Prioritarias Las Líneas de trabajo de la REPAM son:

LE1

COMUNICACIÓN Estratégica-POLÍTICA visibilidad Y DE LA REPAM

LE2

Incidencia SOCIO-POLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL Y PROMOCIÓN DE DERECHOS HUMANOS.

LE3

FORTALECIMIENTO OF protagonism of Cultures Y DE LOS PROYECTOS DE VIDA DE LOS PUEBLOS Indígenas EN LA DEFENSA DE LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS Y ATENCIÓN LOS GRUPOS VULNERABLES EN THE PAN-Amazonia.

LE4

Metodos DE acompañamiento PASTORAL Y FORMACIÓN. Escuela Itinerant Pan-Amazónica

LE5

Colaboración FRATERNAL, REDES INTERNACIONALES Y GESTIÓN DE RECURSOS.

LE6

INVESTIGACIONES SOBRE TERRITORIALIDAD PAN-Amazon.

LE7

IGLESIAS Fronterizas. Articulación Y Colaboración entre miembros DE LA REPAM (POR FRONTERAS, PROXIMIDAD GEOGRAPHICAL Y TEMAS Afines).

LE8

MODELOS ALTERNATIVOS DE DESARROLLO, BUEN VIVIR Y respuestas ANTE EL Climate Change.

Nos encontramos en estos días en Roma para desarrollar Línea de estratégica articulación de redes internacionales de colaboración fraternal, con el objetivo de: Dar conocer la gracia de la fundación de la REPAM como opción de la Iglesia en el marco del Pope Francisco pontificado , y como asumir y búsqueda para responder a la Exhortación apostolic “Evangelii Gaudium”, afirmando nuestra opción por la defensa de la dignidad humana y la justicia para este territory fundamental para la humanidad, y trazando caminos de colaboración en el Ámbito de las redes internacionales eclesiales ante huge desafío en este Pan-Amazonía.

    Más información en www.redamazonica.org

    E-mail de contacto: [email protected]

[00344-04.01] [Texto original: Español]

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