Who is killing? A climate crime scene

August 17, 2016

By  in The Guardian

This week we’re staging protests on the ‘crime scene’ of the world’s affected reefs to send a signal that we’re not going to let fossil fuel firms get away with murder
350.org underwater protest against Exxon and its responsibility in coral bleaching

350.org underwater protest against Exxon and its responsibility in coral bleaching. Photograph: 350.org

Which is why a white, dead reef is so shocking – as shocking in its way as a human corpse lying on the street, which still takes the form of the living breathing person it used to be, but now suddenly is stopped forever, the force that made it real suddenly and grotesquely absent.When a body falls on the street, the police come to investigate. Did this person die of natural causes, or was there foul play involved? When a reef dies, we ask the scientists. And this year they’ve told us the answer in no uncertain terms.The amazingly rapid die-off of a huge percentage of the world’s coral reefs is not a sad but normal tragedy; it’s a crime. Perhaps the fastest, most widespread crime of the global warming era.